There is no reason to specify DIN 19213 instead of IEC 61518

DirectMount System - There is no reason to specify DIN 19213 instead of IEC 61518.

IEC 61518 (DIN EN 61518) is the global standard for Manifold-to-Transmitter Flange Connections. This standard has been issued in 2001. IEC 61518 is based on the German standard DIN 19213 (latest revision 1991 before superseded by IEC 61518). So, basically DIN 19213 is not anymore used with the exception of revision 1980, which is still specified in some standards. IEC 61518 has been prepared by subcommittee 65B and I was one of the subcommittee members. I am really surprised that DIN 19213 is still used after all these years, although there is no technical reason to specify this obsolete standard.

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Small, but powerful: Low torque for a smooth operation

DirectMountSystem - How to ensure a smooth operation of different valve head units.

During my last 12 years in the instrumentation business I get asked at which pressure is a manifold useable and still turnable? As well as, what is the difference between a One-Piece Design and a Two-Piece Design Stem?

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How to ensure compliance with BLM rules

How to ensure compliance with BLM rules.

In my new blog post, I would like to deal with some new rules and regulations. These directives concern the Bureau of Land Management orifice meter measurement (short form: BLM). I am the Sales Director – Americas. From this position, I have seen how the American oil and gas industry is struggling with the new BLM rules.

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Save money with the bubble-tight Soft Seated Valve Design

DirectMountSystem - Save money with the bubble-tight Soft Seated Valve Design.

Besides to the well-known hard seated valves Soft Seated Valves are considered to be bubble-tight and leak-free. Bubble-tight shut off is required to achieve accurate measurement through the use of instrumentation valves and manifolds.

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Stabilized Connectors for DirectMount Systems

DirectMountSystem - Connections with reduced installation costs.

In many industries, orifice meters are used for measuring the rate of flow of liquids and gases. In the past it was common to connect instruments with the main piping by using orifice meters, primary isolation valves, fittings, tubing (impulse piping), remote mount manifolds, pipe stands and further accessories. This conventional installation method is time- and cost-consuming accompanied by some technical issues.

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